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Volume 7 Number 12:  24 March 2004

Temperature Record of the Week
This issue's Temperature Record of the week is from Copperhill, Tennessee. Visit our U.S. Climate Data section to plot and view these data for yourself.

Editorial
Coal-Mine Canaries Keeping Cool on Greenland: What happens climate-wise in earth's polar regions is said by climate alarmists to presage what will subsequently happen to the rest of the globe; and what they say is happening there now is said by them to suggest an unprecedented imminent warming of the entire planet.  Real-world data, however, suggest otherwise.

Subject Index Summaries
Medieval Warm Period (Russia): Climate alarmists continue to claim that the Medieval Warm Period was not particularly warm nor of much note beyond the lands that surround the North Atlantic Ocean.  In this summary we explore this claim as it pertains to Russia.

Long Term Studies (Non-Woody Plants): Do they reveal a gradual decline of the initial CO2-induced stimulation of photosynthesis and growth that is typically observed in short-term experiments, but which has been suggested by certain theoretical studies (and is heavily promoted by climate alarmists) to lead to an equilibrium response of essentially no, or very little, CO2-induced productivity enhancement?

Journal Reviews
Holocene Climate in the Gulf of Mexico: What relation does it bear to the Holocene climate of the North Atlantic Ocean?

The Medieval Warm Period in Southern Tibet: Did it really occur?  And, if so, how did its warmth compare with that of today's?

Dengue Fever: How Will It Respond to Global Warming?: IPCC-inspired climate alarmists claim it will become ever more common throughout the world, even in developed countries such as the United States, which should give one a really big clue that just the opposite is more likely to happen, just as long as we don't mess with our carbon-based economy.

Pathogens vs. Plants in a CO2-Enriched World of the Future: Which will be the winners?

Growth Response of a Common Freshwater Microalga to Doubled Atmospheric CO2: Few experiments have explored this topic, which makes it all the more interesting to find one that does.