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Volume 4 Number 6:  7 February 2001

Temperature Record of the Week
This issue's Temperature Record of the Week is from Groton, Connecticut. Visit our U.S. Climate Data section to plot and view these data for yourself.

Current Editorial
The Crux of the Climate Policy Debate: It has little to do with climate.

Subject Index Summaries
Carbon Sequestration (Missing Carbon): Recent studies suggest that the "missing carbon" that is yearly removed from the atmosphere is being sequestered in terrestrial ecosystems that are responding to the aerial fertilization effect of the ongoing rise in the air's CO2 content.

Sediment Load As a Cause of Coral Bleaching: The natural course of human population growth and societal and economic development over the period of the Industrial Revolution has significantly increased the amount of sediment deposited on coral reefs during historic times, leading to an intensification of bleaching events that are becoming ever more evident.

Current Journal Reviews
Antarctic Sea Ice Trends: Worried that another piece of ice the size of Rhode Island or France has broken away from Antarctica? It happens all the time; yet the sea ice extent around the frozen continent keeps growing ever larger, as its overall temperature slowly declines.

Simulated Climate Change on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet: A new computer model study indicates that large portions of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet are unlikely to be significantly altered by temperature changes even as great as 10C.

Long-Term Effects of Elevated CO2 on Arbutus unedo Trees: Lifelong exposure of a Mediterranean forest tree species to elevated CO2 resulted in significant enhancements of net photosynthetic rates without any signs of photosynthetic down regulation, more than doubling the tree's water-use efficiency.

Long-Term Effects of Elevated CO2 on Oak Trees: Lifelong exposure of oak trees to elevated levels of atmospheric CO2 resulted in significant enhancements of net photosynthesis without any evidence of eventual photosynthetic down regulation, even in 40- to 5-year-old trees.

Effects of Elevated CO2 and Temperature on Five Pasture Species: Elevated CO2 increased photosynthetic rates and biomass accumulation in five pasture species to a greater extent at 28C than it did at 18C.